Q Actions - Call

Q Actions 1.3 update is now available on Google Play!

By | Digital Assistants, User Interface, Voice Search | No Comments

Q Actions now enables you to make calls directly using voice commands, regardless of if your contact is in your phonebook or a third-party app like WhatsApp.

Remembering friends and family across multiple phone books and communication apps is cumbersome. Through voice, you can privately tell Q Actions which contact you want to connect with and what app you want to place the call with, safely and hands free.

Juggling multiple phone books across your apps can be tedious … We got your back!

Also, try out some of the new and improved actions from familiar apps that you already have on your phone: Netflix, Spotify, Waze, Maps, Facebook, and more.

Just launch Q Actions and say:

    • “dial John”, “call Jason on WhatsApp” Phone/WhatsApp
    • “Play Stranger Things”, “watch Netflix originals” Netflix
    • “play songs by Drake”, “play mint playlist”Spotify
    • “take me to work”, “I want to drive home” Waze
    • “are any of my friends nearby?”, “view upcoming events” Facebook

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As always, we welcome your feedback.

 

 

The Next Billion

By | User Interface, Voice | No Comments

When we started Aiqudo less than a year ago, we were focused on voice as the next big thing in tech, a UI that has the potential to be the most profound and disruptive change in consumer technology to date. Being a Silicon Valley company, we naturally focused on how voice could impact our world — savvy tech users who wanted the easiest, fastest way possible to use their technology, and the changes natural language voice could bring about for businesses serving us: voice search, voice commerce, hands free apps while driving, etc.

But as we work with partners who are focused on global deployments across multiple languages, we’re coming to realize that voice could have a much more far-reaching impact. When interacting with technology becomes completely seamless and intuitive, we will extend access to technology to billions of new users in emerging markets where mobile internet devices have arrived but where language or literacy issues may present barriers to usage.

Today, mobile carriers are pushing hard to capture new users in these frontier markets, offering inexpensive Android phones with unlimited data plans and putting internet connections into more hands than ever. Voice interfaces, localized for languages and for locale-specific apps, will unlock the final accessibility challenge for these users, allowing the benefits of the internet to reach far deeper into many societies that have until now been on the other side of the digital divide. Voice has the potential to become the universal interface to the digital world.

New users and a new user interface will certainly mean new entry points and new modalities of use for a broad range of established businesses. Industries that VCs would consider over with, done, un-investable in developed markets will be up for grabs again, and serving billions of users. We’ll see new business models, serving localized needs with localized solutions — this won’t be a walkover for the established incumbents. The next disruption is likely to have its roots far from Silicon Valley.

These are the next billion internet users, and voice is the interface that will power their digital experience.

Voice will be our interface to everything

By | User Interface, Voice | No Comments
Let’s face it, technology has not always been very user friendly. Sometimes that felt by design, so coders could keep their club small and exclusive. But usually there’s a step function innovation that totally changes how we interact with technology and, in so doing, disrupts the old paradigm. The mouse and graphical user interface launched the PC (if you’re old enough, you remember when saying GUI sounded cool). Touch screens were the brilliant innovation that enabled the whole new world of smartphones that we live in today.

Voice is the next disruption. Voice will change how we search, how we shop and manage our experiences with retailers, how we create and consume media. The big guys are placing big bets in the space, and we’re starting to see the payoff on some of those components now – voice recognition now has accuracy above 90%, which is good enough to be workable. With improvements in AI, we’ll have contextual understanding, maintain state, and get to conversational capabilities.

But today, voice doesn’t do very much. Alexa sets a mean timer, but if I want to order an Uber, I have to go to my Alexa app to sign in and register, and then I only get limited capabilities. Why wouldn’t I just go to my Uber app? My Uber app has Home, Work, SFO, already in it, plus my payment info, and I can share my ETA with my contacts. And if I want to check Surfline, forget it – there’s no Skill for that.

This is why we created Aiqudo. Our mobile apps do tons of things for us already – get rides, order food, check the surf, and loads of other interactions every day. But the touch screen interface has resulted in each app becoming an individual silo: you have to open the app, navigate your way down to the action you want, maybe tap through a few screens to select your size or color, checkout, and confirm, and then move to the next app and repeat. Aiqudo lets you use simple, intuitive voice commands to instantly get to the action you want, then seamlessly move on to the next action in another app. Do all the things you want to do in your favorite apps, but now at the speed of voice.

Voice will be our interface to everything, eventually. We’re starting with making voice the interface to the things we do every day with our mobile apps.